Epilogue

Author : Amir Manor

Available : YES
Age Group :Adults
pilogue marks the feature debut of Amir Manor, who wrote and directed the film. It follows a day in the life of an octogenarian Israeli couple coming to terms with their old age. Throughout the film, the man Berl (Yosef Cameron) and the woman Hayuta (Ruvka Gur) must deal with the physical and mental implications of their inevitable ageing process. The film begins with an uncomfortable scene in which a pushy social-security nurse obliges them to reply to various questions and perform some daily exercises in front of her so that she can determine whether they are eligible for state aid. We realize that they are poor and hardly able to pay for the medicine they need to survive. Just as harshly real is the disenchantment they experience on an intellectual level. This is particularly true of Berl, who was a leader of the Israeli Labour movement of the 1940s and still dreams of setting up a cooperative and charity initiative. Later in the movie, Hayuta will point out to him the world has changed and that “coop” no longer means what it used to – it is the name of a chain store. Indeed, after Berl has a heated political altercation with a radio jockey live on the air, we find him selling books written by the same political thinkers who inspired him in his life.

pilogue marks the feature debut of Amir Manor, who wrote and directed the film. It follows a day in the life of an octogenarian Israeli couple coming to terms with their old age. Throughout the film, the man Berl (Yosef Cameron) and the woman Hayuta (Ruvka Gur) must deal with the physical and mental implications of their inevitable ageing process. The film begins with an uncomfortable scene in which a pushy social-security nurse obliges them to reply to various questions and perform some daily exercises in front of her so that she can determine whether they are eligible for state aid. We realize that they are poor and hardly able to pay for the medicine they need to survive. Just as harshly real is the disenchantment they experience on an intellectual level. This is particularly true of Berl, who was a leader of the Israeli Labour movement of the 1940s and still dreams of setting up a cooperative and charity initiative. Later in the movie, Hayuta will point out to him the world has changed and that “coop” no longer means what it used to – it is the name of a chain store. Indeed, after Berl has a heated political altercation with a radio jockey live on the air, we find him selling books written by the same political thinkers who inspired him in his life.

Customer Reviews

No reviews yet

Write your own review

  1 star 2 stars 3 stars 4 stars 5 stars